The Power of Ō Can Help You Draw

At Chartchums we use yoga as a way to stretch our bodies and calm our minds. Many yoga classes we attend begin with the chanting of ōm, a mantra that helps bring the mind, body and spirit together for the individual and a sense of combined purpose for all those in the class. The sound of ōm is one of the basic mantras and is a building block for many other mantras used for meditation and enlightenment.

What does this have to do with charts? Well, the power of ōm made us think of the power of ō, which is the primary shape we rely upon when drawing many of the icons and figures that show up on our charts. You are all familiar with the way we use circles to draw people from our past posts, especially the ones on drawing. https://chartchums.wordpress.com/2012/08/29/lets-talk-some-more-about-drawing/ But there are a few more icons that we find ourselves using quite often that start off as an ō (or circle) so we thought we would share some with you here.

A single circle is the start of a magnifying glass, which often indicates some kind of inquiry. It is a visual reminder for children to “look closely” or “take another look” when they are reading, writing, or doing problem solving of any kind, in any subject. The how-to below shows four steps, but you could very easily stop at the second step, especially when speed and simplicity is of the essence.

The magnifying glass is a symbol that can be used on charts for any subject matter

The magnifying glass is a symbol that can be used on charts for any subject matter

A single circle is also the start of the international no symbol which signifies “do not” or “warning” or any action not permitted or wanted. Teachers often use the “no symbol” to indicate “do not” or “be careful” as in “do not run” or “be careful not to slam the door.” The official universal symbol is red with the diagonal line dissecting the circle from the upper left down to the lower right, although black is also typically seen. In the example below we are letting you know not to use a square when making a “no” sign.

This universal symbol is a favorite that works for a variety of purposes

This universal symbol is a favorite that works for a variety of purposes

Two ō’s or circles can be used to make anything from bicycles to people, but here we show how two circles can be turned into a pair of eyeglasses and a set of binoculars. Eyeglasses work well to indicate when you want kids to “look” or “see.” The binoculars are a fun symbol to use when the action you want is “zooming in” or looking really closely. As before, you can stop at either step 2 or step 3 depending on your purpose and desire.

The arms of the eyeglasses can be angled inward for a slightly different look

The arms of the eyeglasses can be angled inward for a slightly different look

 

Bringing in an actual pair of binoculars will help kids understand just how much this cool tool can aid in seeing things up close

Bringing in an actual pair of binoculars will help kids understand just how much this cool tool can aid in seeing things up close

Of course, as with any drawing lesson, these step-by-step drawing tips are meant to help jump start you to get you going. You will quickly find yourself adding your own details and personality to the drawings you use on your charts. And never worry about a picture or icon being “perfect.” Clarity and purpose should always take priority, as should consideration of time and effort.

With practice, drawing will become easier and faster, as well as more fun. And we all need a bit more fun in our lives. Let us know how it goes, as you use the Power of ō to create charts for and with your kids.

Happy Charting!

Marjorie & Kristi



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