Yes, you really can draw!

Summer is a great time to decompress, smell the roses, and try new things. Whether you canoe on a lake, plant a garden, or attend a workshop, you most likely are using these summer months to get to square one, to rediscover the person you really are deep down, and to relax. But then August comes along and with it the new school year, right around the corner. But the new school year also provides teachers with a sense of renewal, a fresh start, a feeling of renewal.

We have heard from many teachers that they would like to start the new school year feeling better equipped to create the tools and charts that will support the instruction they plan to teach with increased ownership and individuality. But then there is always a big “but.” “I don’t know how to draw.” “It takes me too long to make the charts.” “Clip art is great but it takes so much time to find and print out.”

We hear you and in this post we offer some earlier drawing tips and some newer ideas based on what has helped us create the thousands of images and icons we use to create the visual images that support each teaching point we introduce.

Drawing is about learning to look closely, observe shapes, and practicing matching what the eye observes with the hand that holds the pencil. Continued practice increases your eye-hand coordination.

We often use universal icons to represent look, listen, say, and point. Above are some step-by-step visual how-to’s that will help you remember how to draw eyes, ears, mouths, and fingers.

The circle is the most basic shape, the one most young children draw first. The circle is the foundation of drawing people as well as some of the icons you see above, like binoculars, eyeglasses, and a magnifying glass.

If you don’t think you know how to draw, remember to add to that statement, “not yet.” Try following the models we have shared with you here and before you know it, you too will be drawing! The idea is not to draw like DaVinci, but to draw images that simply and clearly convey the messages you are trying to teach. Then you can teach your students how to draw which will open up a whole new world of expression for them as well.

Never worry about perfection, enjoy your trials, and have fun!

Happy Charting!

Marjorie & Kristi

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