Answering Readers’ Questions

Hello Dear Readers,

We here at chartchums are developing more consistent features to our blog. To support the requests of all of you we will be approaching each month in the following way:

– one post addressing a popular reading or writing unit

– one post that highlights relevant work from our archives

– one post that addresses readers questions

– and one post that looks at charts in a classroom setting

This week we are tackling some of the most popular reader questions of the past two weeks, which we have collected from comments, @chartchums, and chartchums@gmail.com. Here are some answers to those wonderful questions…

Can Kristi share her chart font?

As much as Kristi would love to, the whole idea of the chart font is that it match the pictures you put on your own charts, otherwise it becomes another form of clip art. If you are intimidated by drawing your own chart font, we suggest taking a look at our previous posts about drawing, found here and here or by looking at Make a World by Ed Emberley. Another idea Kristi tried was to have the students make some of the symbols.

Do you do seminars?

We do! We have presented from Texas to Connecticut and many states in between! If you are interested in having us work with you, please direct inquiries to chartchums@gmail.com.

Here is sample of what you can expect when you get a day with the chartchums:

Want the secret to jump-off-the-wall charts that stick with kids? Then you’ll want to meet Kristine Mraz and Marjorie Martinelli, co-authors of Smarter Charts, who will share not only ways to create great charts, but the best practices that will make your charts more powerful and effective than ever. In this one-day workshop Kristi and/or Marjorie will share tips on design and language, instructional use, and self-assessment. You will learn strategies that deepen engagement, strengthen retention, and increase independence—all by involving students in chart making. And you will even learn how to draw!

I am swimming in charts! How many charts should I have up?

At this time of year there are so many charts for routines, it can feel like you are going to use an entire chart pad by the time the month is over. One suggestion to minimize the “print pollution” is to take your routines charts and bind them together with a simple binder ring. Another is to use a sketch pad for these routine charts. Both these strategies allow you to flip to the chart you need at the time you need it. Unlike a “Stretching Words” chart that children may use across the day, a “Setting up For Writing Time” only needs to be seen in that brief window of set-up time. On average, most classrooms have 3 or so charts up for each major subject area.

Book shopping is a routine that needs only the occasional reminder.

Book shopping is a routine that needs only the occasional reminder.

What is “chart-a-day”?

Chart-a-day is an initiative we have started on twitter (@chartchums) to tweet one smart chart every school day. Send us one of yours and we will retweet it to the world!

Feel free to send us your questions, we will answer them again next month! Until then, happy charting!
Kristi and Marjorie


3 Comments on “Answering Readers’ Questions”

  1. Debbie Harrison says:

    Last year I had no problem viewing your sample charts. This year all the pictures are blank. I’m not sure if the problem is at my end or yours, but I just wanted you to know. I have tried switching browsers with no success.

  2. Ann Griffin says:

    I wish there was a way to find a chart for a specific reason on blog: like how readers handle tricky words


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